A Brief History of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM): The month of October, designated to be an observed commemorative month to raise awareness of breast cancer. Established in 1985 as a partnership between the American Cancer Society and the pharmaceutical division of Imperial Chemical Industries (now part of AstraZeneca, a leading manufacturer of oncology drugs).

See . . . → Read More: A Brief History of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Five Pitfalls of Cause Marketing Programs

There are five potential pitfalls to cause marketing campaigns as a way to encourage consumption-based philanthropy. 1. Cause Marketing Benefits the Company First

Cause marketing programs are housed in a company’s marketing division. The objectives are to increase sales, build public relations, and promote employee team-building. Businesses enter into cause marketing partnerships only when these . . . → Read More: Five Pitfalls of Cause Marketing Programs

Book Review: Hiding Politics in Plain Sight

“In a commercial social movement, activists work cooperatively with industry rather than contentiously against it; they employ market mechanisms like cause marketing and corporate-sponsored runs rather than defiant protests or marches. Necessarily conservative… it is a continuation of rather than a sharp break from the past.” — Hiding Politics in Plain Sight: Cause Marketing, Corporate . . . → Read More: Book Review: Hiding Politics in Plain Sight

Breast Cancer and Middle School

By Rachel Cheetham Moro (1970-2012)

Rachel Cheetham Moro was on the ground floor of the Breast Cancer Consortium (BCC). She died on February 6, 2012 of metastatic breast cancer at age 41, just 8 months before BCC’s launch. Rachel became a full-time blogger following a career spanning fifteen years in public accounting and tax . . . → Read More: Breast Cancer and Middle School

A Growing Disenchantment With October ‘Pinkification’

“A Growing Disenchantment With October ‘Pinkification,’” by Gina Kolata, The New York Times, Oct. 30, 2015.

The White House went pink this month, awash for a night in rose-colored light. Delta Air Lines painted a huge pink ribbon on one of its planes, dressed flight attendants in pink and has been selling pink lemonade to . . . → Read More: A Growing Disenchantment With October ‘Pinkification’

The Hidden Costs Of Cause Marketing

By Angela M. Eikenberry

From pink ribbons to Product Red, cause marketing adroitly serves two masters, earning profits for corporations while raising funds for charities. Yet the short-term benefits of cause marketing-also known as consumption philanthropy-belie its long-term costs. These hidden costs include individualizing solutions to collective problems; replacing virtuous action with mindless . . . → Read More: The Hidden Costs Of Cause Marketing

Backlash Against “Pinkwashing” of Breast Cancer Awareness Campaigns

Journalist Meg Carter interviewed Breast Cancer Consortium founder Gayle Sulik for this October 12, 2015 article in the BMJ on how big business is keen to jump on the breast cancer awareness bandwagon, and whether its messages around screening do more harm than good.

Here is an excerpt.

. . . → Read More: Backlash Against “Pinkwashing” of Breast Cancer Awareness Campaigns

Drug Prices Soar, Prompting Calls for Justification

“Drug Prices Soar, Prompting Calls for Justification,” by Andrew Pollack, The New York Times.

Prices for cancer drugs, some of which extend lives by only a couple of months, routinely exceed $100,000 a year, and some new ones exceed $150,000. And it is not unusual for the list prices of existing drugs to rise 10 . . . → Read More: Drug Prices Soar, Prompting Calls for Justification

How Not to Fix the F.D.A.

“How Not to Fix the F.D.A.,” by The Editorial Board, The New York Times.

A bill passed by the House and ostensibly designed to streamline the Food and Drug Administration is loaded with bad provisions and may not even be necessary. The Senate should either eliminate or rewrite the flawed . . . → Read More: How Not to Fix the F.D.A.

Questions about Mayo Clinic deal with Minneapolis TV station

“Questions about Mayo Clinic deal with Minneapolis TV station,” by Trudy Lieberman, Health News Review.

Health News Review publishes a guest blog post by Trudy Lieberman, a veteran health care journalist who, for years, has tracked the cracks in the wall between health care news and health care advertising/sponsorship arrangements.

Back in 2007 writing for . . . → Read More: Questions about Mayo Clinic deal with Minneapolis TV station

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