Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancer

“Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancer,” Mary Chris Jaklevic, Health News Review.

Genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk is cheaper and easier than ever. But just because a test is available doesn’t mean everyone should get it. That message didn’t come through in a recent series of . . . → Read More: Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancer

Breast cancer patients share DNA data

“Breast cancer patients share DNA data,” The Boston Globe, Oct. 28, 2015.

Accessing an untapped data source — the DNA of metastatic patients.

The Metastatic Breast Cancer Project — a collaboration of the Broad, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School, launched this month, asks individuals who have been diagnosed with metastatic breast . . . → Read More: Breast cancer patients share DNA data

Surge in competition in genetic risk screening warrants caution

A recent article in The New York Times “New Genetic Tests for Breast Cancer Hold Promise” describes new and cheaper tests for BRCA1 and 2 gene mutations that carry added risk for breast and ovarian cancers. Medical guidelines generally limit testing of the so-called “breast cancer genes” to the small percentage of people who already . . . → Read More: Surge in competition in genetic risk screening warrants caution

Book Review: Waiting for Cancer to Come

Waiting for Cancer to Come weaves together women’s beliefs and experiences of genetic testing and its impact on their lives, families, and futures. Their detailed accounts of how they prepared for testing, made sense of the results, and made decisions about what to do with the information and cope with the aftermath are a window . . . → Read More: Book Review: Waiting for Cancer to Come

Cancer Researchers Find “The Angelina Jolie Effect”

“Cancer Researchers Find “The Angelina Jolie Effect” By Kyle Hill, Nerdist.

When Angelina Jolie learned about her own genetic predisposition to breast cancer – and made her diagnosis and treatment very public – she unknowingly urged thousands of women to follow her lead. The announcement of her surgery was maybe more galvanizing than any recent . . . → Read More: Cancer Researchers Find “The Angelina Jolie Effect”

Cancer connected to glucose and microenvironments?

“Cancer connected to glucose and microenvironments?” By Kathleen Hoffman, Medivizor.

Why does nature repeat the same forms over and over again? This is a question that has driven Dr. Mina Bissell‘s cancer research.

In a 2012 TED talk, Dr. Bissell spent 17 minutes summarizing decades of research–asking and answering unique questions that are toppling . . . → Read More: Cancer connected to glucose and microenvironments?

Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests

“Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests,” By Denise Grady and Andrew Pollack. The New York Times.

Within the next year, at least 100,000 people in the U.S. are expected to have genetic tests. Building on the success of using genetic tests to uncover inherited risks of breast, ovarian and colon . . . → Read More: Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests

Face Your Risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Empowered

I wish someone had told me about genetic mutations and cancer risk in 2003 when, in my mid-30s, I was first diagnosed with breast cancer. Even though women diagnosed with breast cancer at younger ages are more likely to have a genetic mutation, after combing through every scrap of paper I collected during that time, . . . → Read More: Face Your Risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Empowered

New Understanding of Cancer and Which Cells are Important

“New Understanding of Cancer and Which Cells are Important.” By Susan Love, Act with Love Blog.

Two new studies are causing researchers to rethink their assumptions about cancer and metastases, turning some previous theories on their heads. Dr. Susan Love explains the science and its implications.

In her blog, Dr. Susan Love first points out . . . → Read More: New Understanding of Cancer and Which Cells are Important

Cancer and the Secrets of Your Genes

“Cancer and the Secrets of Your Genes.” By Theodora Ross, The New York Times.

An oncologist looks at the evidence for genetic testing in certain circumstances. This takes the conversation a step further.

On Aug. 6, researchers announced in The New England Journal of Medicine that they . . . → Read More: Cancer and the Secrets of Your Genes

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