A Brief History of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM): The month of October, designated to be an observed commemorative month to raise awareness of breast cancer. Established in 1985 as a partnership between the American Cancer Society and the pharmaceutical division of Imperial Chemical Industries (now part of AstraZeneca, a leading manufacturer of oncology drugs).

See . . . → Read More: A Brief History of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The Lives They Lived: Shirley Temple Black

“Shirley Temple Black: She broke the silence about breast cancer,” Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times.

In the fall of 1972, Shirley Temple Black noticed a lump in her left breast. Peggy Orenstein writes that it’s hard to imagine now, when celebrity breast-cancer diagnoses bring an inevitable publicity windfall, how risky it was for this . . . → Read More: The Lives They Lived: Shirley Temple Black

Writing About Breast Cancer: From Books to Blogs

Published on the Wellesley Centers for Women blog, Women = Books and reprinted with permission.

It’s easy to forget that women’s writing about breast cancer is of relatively recent vintage. But until the 1970s, the disease was the exclusive province of medical men—and their textbooks.

The first women to portray the patient’s perspective, to write . . . → Read More: Writing About Breast Cancer: From Books to Blogs

Gender Power and Feminisms in Breast Cancer Advocacy

Lessons from the United States and Poland by Gayle Sulik (USA) and Edyta Zierkiewicz (Poland)

The United States breast cancer movement helped to transform breast cancer’s social and medical landscape domestically and, in some ways, internationally. However, differences in gender identities, power relations, and the role of feminism(s) cross‐culturally also shaped breast cancer advocacy itself. . . . → Read More: Gender Power and Feminisms in Breast Cancer Advocacy

Book Review: My Soul Is Among Lions

Ellen Leopold’s unique collection of essays over a 20-year period (many of them written before there was an audience ready to receive them) illustrates important shifts in the medical and social history of breast cancer. She skillfully threads her way through the writings of impactful women and the contexts in which they lived, chronicling the . . . → Read More: Book Review: My Soul Is Among Lions by Ellen Leopold

Women = Books: Writing About Breast Cancer

“Women = Books: Writing About Breast Cancer.” By Ellen Leopold, Wellesley Centers for Women.

It’s easy to forget that women’s writing about breast cancer is of relatively recent vintage. But until the 1970s, the disease was the exclusive province of medical men—and their textbooks. The first women to portray the patient’s perspective, to write about . . . → Read More: Women = Books: Writing About Breast Cancer

Articles & Posts