War metaphors in breast cancer – “brave” word angers some

“War metaphors in breast cancer – “brave” word angers some,” by Sally James, Health News Review.

Sally James, a Seattle-based freelance writer, who is a regular story and news release reviewer for Health News Review.

A recent campaign by the Centers for Disease Control is called Bring Your Brave and aims to get younger . . . → Read More: War metaphors in breast cancer – “brave” word angers some

After cancer treatment, I had to walk away from my life as I knew it

“After cancer treatment, I had to walk away from my life as I knew it,” by Sonja Koenig, The Globe and Mail.

Sonja Koenig lives in Yellowknife. She just completed a year’s sabbatical in New York.

It is back there somewhere in the morass of it all; the decision I made to just . . . → Read More: After cancer treatment, I had to walk away from my life as I knew it

Ending ‘The War’ And Giving Up ‘The Fight': How Not To Talk About Cancer

“Ending ‘The War’ And Giving Up ‘The Fight’: How Not To Talk About Cancer” by Dr. Isaac Chan, Wbur’s Common Health.

Hers was the face of someone defeated by cancer. Our conversation was grim. She wanted to “fight,” to continue treatment. But there were no more options. I vaguely remember speaking, feeling hopelessly ill-equipped. I, . . . → Read More: Ending ‘The War’ And Giving Up ‘The Fight’: How Not To Talk About Cancer

The 'war on cancer' has run off course

“Change the cancer conversation: The ‘war on cancer’ has run off course,” by Colin Macilwain, Nature.

When Angelina Jolie had a double mastectomy in 2013 after genetic tests revealed her susceptibility to certain cancers, she urged others to consider their risk. Even more people will do so now that she has had her ovaries and . . . → Read More: The ‘war on cancer’ has run off course

Ferguson Shooting, Not Ice-Bucket Craze, Demands Philanthropy’s Focus

“Ferguson Shooting, Not Ice-Bucket Craze, Demands Philanthropy’s Focus” By Amy Schiller, The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

While the ice-bucket challenge did provoke some debate about philanthropic priorities, most didn’t ask the really tough questions. We should ask ourselves how nonprofits, which are devoted to improving the world and extending generosity to others, are so easily able . . . → Read More: Ferguson Shooting, Not Ice-Bucket Craze, Demands Philanthropy’s Focus

Wounded by the Language of War

“Wounded by the Language of War” by Paula Span, The New York Times.

When did the language we use to talk about death start to resemble a Pentagon briefing, full of military references and combat analogies? Maybe it dates to 1971, when Richard Nixon declared a “war on cancer.” Or much earlier, in the late . . . → Read More: Wounded by the Language of War

Changing the conversation on breast cancer in Italy – reflections by Dr Grazia De Michele

The first word I managed to utter upon hearing the news that I had breast cancer was ‘why’. Why breast cancer, at such a young age, with no family history or risk factor? It was November 2010. Four months had passed since my thirtieth birthday.

I was living in the UK at that time, but . . . → Read More: Changing the conversation on breast cancer in Italy – reflections by Dr Grazia De Michele

Infantilizing life’s troubles: One has to wonder why a campaign like Pink Shirt Day is needed

“Infantilizing life’s troubles: One has to wonder why a campaign like Pink Shirt Day is needed,” by Pete McMartin, The Vancouver Sun.

I wear pink on occasion. A button-down Oxford cloth shirt with a blue blazer. For me, it’s an edgy fashion statement, not the colour of altruism.

When my wife was diagnosed with breast . . . → Read More: Infantilizing life’s troubles

Misfearing Breast Cancer

“Misfearing Breast Cancer: More evidence that routine mammograms make healthy people sick.” by Christie Aschwanden, Slate.

What’s the No. 1 killer of women? It’s a question that practitioners asked every new patient at a clinic where physician Lisa Rosenbaum once worked, and she hasn’t forgotten the answer given to her by one middle-aged woman with . . . → Read More: Misfearing Breast Cancer

DCIS, No Easy Answers

“No Easy Answers,” by Christie Aschwanden, Protomag.com.

A ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosis can spur premature action // Should it be called cancer? // A new name might mean a different approach // Because what if it’s nothing?

The name given to a certain breast condition—ductal carcinoma in situ—contains a word almost everyone finds terrifying: . . . → Read More: DCIS, No Easy Answers

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