Stink Pink

“Stink Pink” By Phil Brown, Huffington Post.

What does it mean “to pink?” It means corporations get to look charitable, while getting cheap advertising. It means that people buy into a commodification of the suffering of women who have had breast cancer and their families, and the fears of so many others that they may . . . → Read More: Stink Pink

Pinkwashing: Fracking Company Teams Up With Susan G. Komen to ‘End Breast Cancer Forever’

“Pinkwashing: Fracking Company Teams Up With Susan G. Komen to ‘End Breast Cancer Forever.’” By Sandra Steingraber, Ecowatch.

Susan G. Komen, the largest breast cancer organization in America with more than 100,000 volunteers and partnerships in more than 50 countries, has teamed up with Baker Hughes, one of the world’s largest oilfield service companies with . . . → Read More: Pinkwashing: Fracking Company Teams Up With Susan G. Komen to ‘End Breast Cancer Forever’

Komen Sees Significant Drop in 2013 Contributions

“Komen Sees Significant Drop in 2013 Contributions.” Philanthropy News Digest.

Contributions to Dallas-based Susan G. Komen for the Cure fell 22 percent in the twelve months following its decision in January 2012 to stop funding Planned Parenthood affiliates — a decision it subsequently reversed, the Associated Press reports.

Citing audited financial statements (49 pages, PDF) . . . → Read More: Komen Sees Significant Drop in 2013 Contributions

Why did Komen for the Cure give Nancy Brinker a 64 percent raise?

“Why did Komen for the Cure give Nancy Brinker a 64 percent raise?” By Mary Elizabeth Williams, Salon.com.

Komen, already under fire for shrinking contributions for breast cancer research, paid its CEO $684,000 last year.

In 2012, the breast cancer organization ignited a firestorm by announcing it was pulling its funding for breast cancer screenings . . . → Read More: Why did Komen for the Cure give Nancy Brinker a 64 percent raise?

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

“Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer.” By Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times Magazine.

I used to believe that a mammogram saved my life. I even wrote that in the pages of this magazine. It was 1996, and I had just turned 35 when my doctor sent me for an initial screening — a . . . → Read More: Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

How to Move Your Nonprofit Brand Forward Without Alienating Your Base

“How to Move Your Nonprofit Brand Forward Without Alienating Your Base.” By Matthew Zachary, Huffington Post

A key component of healthy growth for any nonprofit is also developing strategic partnerships with major corporations, while at the same time staying grounded with core audiences who value grassroots efforts. As nonprofits, we seek a diversified and balanced . . . → Read More: How to Move Your Nonprofit Brand Forward Without Alienating Your Base

Komen CEO's Resignation Only Makes Critics Angrier

“Komen CEO’s Resignation Only Makes Critics Angrier.” By Holly Hall, The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Susan G. Komen for the Cure may have hoped to halt a sharp drop in donations just ahead of its busy fall fundraising season, but instead it has made many disgruntled donors even angrier. The breast-cancer charity made big leadership changes . . . → Read More: Komen CEO’s Resignation Only Makes Critics Angrier

A teaching moment about politics and Komen

“A teaching moment about politics and Komen.” By Samantha King, CNN

When the Komen foundation bowed to pressure from anti-abortion activists to stop most of its funding of Planned Parenthood, the furor was swift and forceful. Komen’s decision was frequently described in the media and in the online outcry as a “betrayal” — of its . . . → Read More: A teaching moment about politics and Komen

Why the Komen/Planned Parenthood Breakup—While It Lasted—Was Good for Feminism

“Why the Komen/Planned Parenthood Breakup—While It Lasted—Was Good for Feminism.” By Amy Schiller, The Nation

It might not look like it at first, but Komen’s actions and the ensuing backlash are a huge boon for the feminist movement. The past decades have seen the rise of a nominally apolitical marketing campaign masquerading as feminism, . . . → Read More: Why the Komen/Planned Parenthood Breakup—While It Lasted—Was Good for Feminism