Some cancer experts see overdiagnosis and question early detection

“Some cancer experts see overdiagnosis and question early detection” By Melinda Beck, The Wall Street Journal.

“We’re not finding enough of the really lethal cancers, and we’re finding too many of the slow-moving ones that probably don’t need to be found,” says Laura Esserman, a breast-cancer surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco.

Early . . . → Read More: Some cancer experts see overdiagnosis and question early detection

“Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

““Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks,” by Lisa Rosenbaum MD, New England Journal of Medicine.

“Misfearing,” the term Cass Sunstein uses to describe the human tendency to fear instinctively rather than factually, is not unique to women’s perceived health threats. Decades of research on risk perception have revealed the many factors . . . → Read More: “Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?

“Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?” By Christine Norton and Karen Sepucha, Health News Review).

Health News Review evaluates health reporting on medical interventions from the top ten circulating newspapers in the United States. The evaluation is based on established criteria related to costs of the intervention, quantification of benefits and harms, critical evaluation of . . . → Read More: Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?

In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

“In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent” By Mary Elizabeth Williams, Los Angeles Times.

It’s been three years since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force launched the mammography wars with its recommendation that most women get fewer of the breast cancer screening exams — one every other year between the ages . . . → Read More: In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

Breast practices: The mammogram dilemma

“Breast practices: The mammogram dilemma.” By H. Gilbert Welch, The Los Angeles Times

There is growing evidence that screening mammograms aren’t all they’ve been cracked up to be. This month it was “More mammograms, more problems” — a study showing that screening every year (instead of every other) didn’t produce any benefit but did produce . . . → Read More: Breast practices: The mammogram dilemma

The Risk-Benefit Calculation of Mammograms

“The Risk-Benefit Calculation of Mammograms.” By Christie Aschwanden, Slate

Last week on Slate, physician Meri Kolbrener lamented that she didn’t have a good way to explain the latest evidence on mammography to her patients. When patients ask her if they should get a mammogram, Kolbrener’s answer is, “I don’t know.” Kolbrener is correct that the . . . → Read More: The Risk-Benefit Calculation of Mammograms

Ignoring the Science on Mammograms

“Ignoring the Science on Mammograms. By David H. Newman MD, The New York Times Well Blog

Last week The New England Journal of Medicine published a study with the potential to change both medical practice and public consciousness about mammograms. Published on Thanksgiving Day, the research examined more than 30 years of United States health . . . → Read More: Ignoring the Science on Mammograms

Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?

“Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?” By H. Gilbert Welch, The New York Times

For decades women have been told that one of the most important things they can do to protect their health is to have regular mammograms. But over the past few years, it’s become increasingly clear that these screenings are not all . . . → Read More: Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?

Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence

“Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence.” By A. Bleyer and H.G. Welch, New England Journal of Medicine

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine concludes that one-third of all newly diagnosed breast cancers are the result of overdiagnosis, and screening is having a marginal effect on the breast . . . → Read More: Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence