Some cancer experts see overdiagnosis and question early detection

“Some cancer experts see overdiagnosis and question early detection” By Melinda Beck, The Wall Street Journal.

“We’re not finding enough of the really lethal cancers, and we’re finding too many of the slow-moving ones that probably don’t need to be found,” says Laura Esserman, a breast-cancer surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco.

Early . . . → Read More: Some cancer experts see overdiagnosis and question early detection

Should We Rename DCIS?

Ductal carcinoma in situ was all over the news this week, after the Journal of the American Medical Association published “Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment in Cancer, An Opportunity for Improvement.” This is a good, and necessary, conversation. DCIS was front and center as one of the prime candidates for overtreatment, and the panel proposed renaming it . . . → Read More: Should We Rename DCIS?

What’s In A Name? Cancer – or Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin

“What’s In A Name? Cancer – or Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin.” By Jody Schoger, Michael S. Cowher, M.D., and Deanna J. Attai, M.D., F.A.C.S., BCSMCommunity.org.

What’s in a name? In the case of cancer, there are myths, fears and misinformation – more than perhaps any other illness. Cancer encompasses hundreds of different diseases and . . . → Read More: What’s In A Name? Cancer – or Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin

“Carcinoma”: What’s in a name?

As part of a National Cancer Institute working group, Dr. Laura J. Esserman MD, MBA of Mt Zion Carol Franc Buck Breast Cancer Center along with colleagues Ian Thompson MD of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and Brian Reid MD, PhD of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, . . . → Read More: “Carcinoma”: What’s in a name?

Jolie’s Disclosure of Preventive Mastectomy Highlights Dilemma

“Jolie’s Disclosure of Preventive Mastectomy Highlights Dilemma.” By Denise Grady, The New York Times.

One of the defining moments in the history of breast cancer occurred in 1974 when the first lady, Betty Ford, spoke openly about her mastectomy, lifting a veil of secrecy from the disease and ushering in a new era of breast . . . → Read More: Jolie’s Disclosure of Preventive Mastectomy Highlights Dilemma

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer: MBCN Responds

“Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer: MBCN Responds.” By Katherine O’Brien, MBCN Secretary, Metastatic Breast Cancer Network.

Editor’s Note: Peggy Orenstein’s April 25, 2013 article–the cover story for this Sunday’ s New York Times’ Magazine, demonstrates a remarkable depth and thoughtfulness. It is long–but well-worth the effort to read. For those looking for a quick . . . → Read More: Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer: MBCN Responds

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

“Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer.” By Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times Magazine.

I used to believe that a mammogram saved my life. I even wrote that in the pages of this magazine. It was 1996, and I had just turned 35 when my doctor sent me for an initial screening — a . . . → Read More: Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?

“Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?” By Christine Norton and Karen Sepucha, Health News Review).

Health News Review evaluates health reporting on medical interventions from the top ten circulating newspapers in the United States. The evaluation is based on established criteria related to costs of the intervention, quantification of benefits and harms, critical evaluation of . . . → Read More: Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?

How Doctors Die

“How Doctors Die.” By Ken Murray, MD, The Saturday Evening Post.

It’s not a frequent topic of discussion, but doctors die, too. And they don’t die like the rest of us. What’s unusual about them is not how much treatment they get compared to most Americans, but how little. For all the time they spend . . . → Read More: How Doctors Die