“Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

““Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks,” by Lisa Rosenbaum MD, New England Journal of Medicine.

“Misfearing,” the term Cass Sunstein uses to describe the human tendency to fear instinctively rather than factually, is not unique to women’s perceived health threats. Decades of research on risk perception have revealed the many factors . . . → Read More: “Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

Mammograms can help--and harm

“Mammograms can help–and harm.” By H. Gilbert Welch, CNN.

As part of breast cancer awareness month, a 40-year-old anchor had her first mammogram on morning television. And last week the anchor, Amy Robach, underwent a double mastectomy after announcing she had cancer, and saying — in front of 5 million viewers — that “having a . . . → Read More: Mammograms can help–and harm

I’m just saying no to mammography: Why the numbers are in my favor

“I’m just saying no to mammography: Why the numbers are in my favor.” By Christie Aschwanden, The Washington Post.

A few days after my 40th birthday, I had a routine appointment with my gynecologist. As she turned to leave the exam room, she handed me a slip of paper without saying a word. It was . . . → Read More: I’m just saying no to mammography: Why the numbers are in my favor

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

“Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer.” By Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times Magazine.

I used to believe that a mammogram saved my life. I even wrote that in the pages of this magazine. It was 1996, and I had just turned 35 when my doctor sent me for an initial screening — a . . . → Read More: Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

Thought Provoking Questions Raised in Breast Cancer Debate

Panel Discussion on March 5, 2013

The NGender Seminar Series at the University of Sussex (U.K.) teamed up with Breast Cancer Consortium members Dr. Ana Porroche-Escudero (University of Sussex) and Dr. Grazia de Michele to co-host a special session on Breast Cancer Awareness to celebrate International Women’s Day. The event involved the screening . . . → Read More: Thought Provoking Questions Raised in Breast Cancer Debate

In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

“In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent” By Mary Elizabeth Williams, Los Angeles Times.

It’s been three years since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force launched the mammography wars with its recommendation that most women get fewer of the breast cancer screening exams — one every other year between the ages . . . → Read More: In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

Breast practices: The mammogram dilemma

“Breast practices: The mammogram dilemma.” By H. Gilbert Welch, The Los Angeles Times

There is growing evidence that screening mammograms aren’t all they’ve been cracked up to be. This month it was “More mammograms, more problems” — a study showing that screening every year (instead of every other) didn’t produce any benefit but did produce . . . → Read More: Breast practices: The mammogram dilemma

Should Breast Cancer in Young Women Be Treated Differently?

“Should Breast Cancer in Young Women Be Treated Differently?” By BCC member Jody Schoger, Cure

Even after Ghecemy Lopez, 32, discovered a lump in her right breast and had a mammogram, she still couldn’t imagine she had cancer. She thought breast cancer struck older women, not someone her age. She got the same impression from . . . → Read More: Should Breast Cancer in Young Women Be Treated Differently?

Cancer tests you need – and those you don’t

“Cancer tests you need – and those you don’t.” By Gary Schwitzer, Health News Review

The cover story of the March edition of Consumer Reports is “The cancer tests you need – and those you don’t.“ You need a subscription to access the full content, but Schwitzer shares the article headings as well as key . . . → Read More: Cancer tests you need – those you don’t