Concerned about fracking, Part 1: Air Pollution and Accidents

By Margaret Roberts

In this three-part series on fracking and human health, Margaret Roberts of Capital Region Action Against Breast Cancer and the New York State Breast Cancer Network explores some of the many reasons health advocates and others are concerned about the combination of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) with horizontal drilling, a large-scale industrial practice . . . → Read More: Concerned about fracking, Part 1: Air Pollution and Accidents

Are Concerns About Fracking Well-Founded?

Image Credit: EnvironmentalHealthProject.Org

Within the last decade, the combination of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) with horizontal drilling has initiated large-scale drilling for natural gas across the United States. The fracking process begins with well construction, drilled into geologic formations that may contain large quantities of oil or gas, and then stimulates the release of . . . → Read More: Are Concerns About Fracking Well-Founded?

Stink Pink

“Stink Pink” By Phil Brown, Huffington Post.

What does it mean “to pink?” It means corporations get to look charitable, while getting cheap advertising. It means that people buy into a commodification of the suffering of women who have had breast cancer and their families, and the fears of so many others that they may . . . → Read More: Stink Pink

Pinkwashing: Fracking Company Teams Up With Susan G. Komen to ‘End Breast Cancer Forever’

“Pinkwashing: Fracking Company Teams Up With Susan G. Komen to ‘End Breast Cancer Forever.’” By Sandra Steingraber, Ecowatch.

Susan G. Komen, the largest breast cancer organization in America with more than 100,000 volunteers and partnerships in more than 50 countries, has teamed up with Baker Hughes, one of the world’s largest oilfield service companies with . . . → Read More: Pinkwashing: Fracking Company Teams Up With Susan G. Komen to ‘End Breast Cancer Forever’

“13th Report on Carcinogens”

“13th Report on Carcinogens.” Department of Health and Human Services.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell released the 13th Report on Carcinogens on October 2, 2014. (Press Release).The Report on Carcinogens (RoC) is a congressionally mandated, science-based, public health document that the NTP prepared for the HHS Secretary. The report . . . → Read More: “13th Report on Carcinogens”

In Plastics and Cans, a Threat to Women

“In Plastics and Cans, a Threat to Women.” By Deborah Blum, The New York Times Well Blog.

Concerns about the health risks of bisphenol A, or BPA arose when researchers first reported in the 1990s that it appeared to disrupt normal hormone function. The Food and Drug Administration banned the chemical in baby products. While . . . → Read More: In Plastics and Cans, a Threat to Women

Leading Male Breast Cancer Advocate Passes

““The First Time I Knew I Had Breasts” – Leading Male Breast Cancer Advocate Passes.” By Kathleen Hoffman, Medivizor.

Editorial Note: According to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs people living or working at the U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina from the 1950s through the 1980s were potentially to drinking water . . . → Read More: Leading Male Breast Cancer Advocate Passes

Prenatal and Postnatal BPA Exposure

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a chemical used in a variety of everyday consumer products, including bicycle helmets, the plastics used to manufacture water bottles, baby bottles and utensils and the linings of many food cans. For more than a decade scientific evidence has accumulated to suggest that exposure to BPA, a chemical that is useful as . . . → Read More: Prenatal and Postnatal BPA Exposure

How looking for cancer’s causes became a political act

“How looking for cancer’s causes became a political act.” By Heather Smith, Grist.

How does real political change happen? Jeanne Rizzo has spent decades figuring that out — but not along any typical route. First a psychiatric nurse, then a concert hall manager and film, music, and theater producer, she gradually became more and more . . . → Read More: How looking for cancer’s causes became a political act

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