Oncofertility: Beyond Biological Motherhood, Towards Reproductive Justice

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Is Childlessness Really Another Side Effect of Cancer?

The emphasis on biological motherhood in the field of oncofertility masks at least two societal forces contributing to the cancer/infertility equation.

First, the conditions in which people live and work are are already linked to cancers and adverse effects on women’s . . . → Read More: Oncofertility: Beyond Biological Motherhood, Towards Reproductive Justice – 3

Oncofertility: Beyond Biological Motherhood, Towards Reproductive Justice

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Rethinking Normative Expectations

As professionals, we have to balance our responsibility to care, inform and research for safer fertility treatments while respecting women’s choices that may at times go against dominant models of womanhood. In doing so, it is crucial to acknowledge several problems stemming from norms about reproduction . . . → Read More: Oncofertility: Beyond Biological Motherhood, Towards Reproductive Justice – 2

Oncofertility: Beyond Biological Motherhood, Towards Reproductive Justice

PAGES: 1 2 3

Cancer and cancer treatments can have a huge impact on women’s sexual and reproductive health. Yet, when I started my research on breast cancer and social inequality in Spain a decade ago this issue was hardly being addressed in international scholarly debates or in clinical settings. Several of the . . . → Read More: Oncofertility: Beyond Biological Motherhood, Towards Reproductive Justice

The Paradox of Women’s Sexuality in Breast Feeding Advocacy and Breast Cancer Campaigns

By Jennifer Rothchild

Jennifer Rothchild, PhD is in the sociology and gender, women, & sexuality studies departments at the University of Minnesota, Morris. She is the author of Gender Trouble Makers: Education and Empowerment in Nepal and is currently doing research on the politics of breastfeeding. Her essay was originally published on Sociological Images . . . → Read More: The Paradox of Women’s Sexuality in Breast Feeding Advocacy and Breast Cancer Campaigns

Queering Breast Cancer: ARRETA, The Documentary You Can Help To Finish

Filmmakers Raquel Marques and María Zafra are proud to announce a crowdfunding campaign for Arreta, a long overdue film on queer experiences of breast cancer.

“Arreta” (meaning ‘attention’ in Basque) is a compelling documentary filmed in Barcelona and Gernika, Spain, that follows Ainhoa, co-founder of Cancer Butch who, after being treated for breast cancer, . . . → Read More: Queering Breast Cancer: ARRETA, The Documentary You Can Help To Finish

The Invisible Scars: Feminist Perspectives on Breast Cancer

Cicatrius (in)visibles (The Invisible Scars), a new book edited by Ana Porroche-Escudero, Gerard Coll-Planas, and Caterina Riba published in March (2016) by Capsa de Pandora.

The book, translated into in Catalan, demystifies the dominant discourses of pink ribbon culture, analyzes androcentric, political, and economic biases in breast cancer biomedicine, and explores embodied resistance . . . → Read More: The Invisible Scars: Feminist Perspectives on Breast Cancer

How Doctors Take Women's Pain Less Seriously

“How Doctors Take Women’s Pain Less Seriously,” The Atlantic, Oct. 15, 2015.

When my wife was struck by mysterious, debilitating symptoms, our trip to the ER revealed the sexism inherent in emergency treatment.

“Female pain might be perceived as constructed or exaggerated”: We saw this from the moment we entered the hospital, as the staff . . . → Read More: How Doctors Take Women’s Pain Less Seriously

The Lives They Lived: Shirley Temple Black

“Shirley Temple Black: She broke the silence about breast cancer,” Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times.

In the fall of 1972, Shirley Temple Black noticed a lump in her left breast. Peggy Orenstein writes that it’s hard to imagine now, when celebrity breast-cancer diagnoses bring an inevitable publicity windfall, how risky it was for this . . . → Read More: The Lives They Lived: Shirley Temple Black

'Tis the Season for Dallas Restaurant Breast Cancer Fundraisers with Stupid, Sexist Names

“‘Tis the Season for Dallas Restaurant Breast Cancer Fundraisers with Stupid, Sexist Names” By Amy McCarthy, Dallas Observer.

Aside from the fact that no one over the age of 13 should be saying the word “boobies,” there is something troubling in sexualizing a highly dangerous disease, which is what you do when you turn “breast . . . → Read More: ‘Tis the Season for Dallas Restaurant Breast Cancer Fundraisers with Stupid, Sexist Names

Harassment in Science, Replicated

“Harassment in Science, Replicated.” By Christie Aschwanden, The New York Times.

Women researchers report that sexual harassment and assault are common at field sites and in universities.

Almost two-thirds of the respondents in one study said they had been sexually harassed in the field, with more than 20 percent reporting that they had been . . . → Read More: Harassment in Science, Replicated

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