“This Is Bad Enough” by Elspeth Murray

“This is bad enough” was written by poet Elspeth Murray for the launch of the cancer information reference group of SCAN, the South East Scotland Cancer Network (January 20, 2006). Her poem is a plea for clarity in an increasingly complex health care system that too often relies on jargon rather than information and tools . . . → Read More: “This Is Bad Enough” by Elspeth Murray

I'm Not The Perfect Cancer Survivor. But I've Learned To Live With That

by Adam Bessie, Marc Parenteau, and Gayle Sulik, Narratively, February 16, 2017.

Adam Bessie is a San Francisco Bay Area based writer, whose comics on living with cancer have been featured in The Boston Globe, The Pacific Standard, Fusion, and more. See an extra, unpublished scene from this comic and the rest of this series . . . → Read More: I’m Not The Perfect Cancer Survivor. But I’ve Learned To Live With That

Book Review: Reading & Writing Cancer

“For those who survive and those who do not.”

That is the dedication Susan Gubar gives to her new book, Reading & Writing Cancer: How Words Heal. The straight-forward acknowledgement that some people with cancer survive and others do not, suggests instantly that this book is not be about drippy cancer stories floating rhetoric of . . . → Read More: Book Review: Reading & Writing Cancer

Eva Endures

By Christine Byl

Author Christine Byl writes in memory of her friend Eva Saulitus, an author and field biologist who died of metastatic breast cancer on January 16th, 2016 at age fifty-two. We shared an excerpt of one of Eva’s writings, Wild Darkness, on Breast Cancer Consortium last year and were deeply saddened to learn . . . → Read More: Eva Endures

The Dehumanizing Impact of Biomedical Surveillance

Writer Adam Bessie was diagnosed with a form of brain cancer six years ago. Since that time, he’s had at least 30 MRIs. In the six-week period it took him to complete his most recent writing project, he had radiation treatments and x-ray scans five days a week. That’s 30 more scans! It stands to . . . → Read More: The Dehumanizing Impact of Biomedical Surveillance

Book Review: Cancer Made Me A Shallower Person

Computer trainer Miriam Engelberg had always been a voracious reader of comics, from the popular satire of Mad Magazine to the more literary and autobiographical comics written by Harvey Pekar, Lynda Barry and others. Following the birth of her son Aaron, she set out to create a few panels of her own to spoof the . . . → Read More: Book Review: Cancer Made Me A Shallower Person

Announcement: Featuring Artists Isabel Franc and Judith Vizcarra

Isabel Franc is a professional comic creator and author of Alicia en un mundo real [Alice in the real world] – as opposed to Alice in wonderland]. The comic is a critical reflection of the author’s experience of breast cancer.

On October, 24th, there will be an experiential workshop with Isabel Franc for women who . . . → Read More: Announcement: Featuring Artists Isabel Franc and Judith Vizcarra

Visualizing Social Change: The Power of Graphic Arts

Originally published at Feminist Reflections on The Society Pages.

Graphic arts engage readers in a way text cannot. Told with sequences of pictures, along with narration and dialogue (often in the form of speech bubbles), graphic arts have become increasingly popular media for education and communication as well as social commentary. From disaster preparedness to . . . → Read More: Visualizing Social Change: The Power of Graphic Arts

Announcement: Steve Davenport Readings

Steve Davenport is the author of two poetry collections: Overpass (Arsenic Lobster/Misty Publications, 2012) and Uncontainable Noise (Pavement Saw Press, 2006). The terrain of Overpass is the Illinois floodplain across the river from St. Louis; the figure who hovers above it all is a woman diagnosed with breast cancer named Overpass Girl.

Breast Cancer Consortium . . . → Read More: Announcement: Steve Davenport Readings

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