A banner week for CDA (Celebrity Disease Awareness)

“A banner week for CDA (Celebrity Disease Awareness),” Alan Cassels, Health News Review.

Celebrity disease awareness (or pushing of disease-mongered conditions) is not going away soon. But maybe it could be tied to the goal of informing consumers instead of misleading them or promoting personal financial incentives. Here are a few celebs, for better or . . . → Read More: A banner week for CDA (Celebrity Disease Awareness)

The Lives They Lived: Lisa Bonchek Adams

“The Lives They Lived: Lisa Bonchek Adams,” by Elizabeth Weil, The New York Times, Dec. 23, 2015.

She taught us how to die.

Death presents a problem every time. Everybody’s a rookie, everybody’s afraid.

Lisa Bonchek Adams typed her way unto the breach. A realist, an atheist and not at all sappy, she detested the . . . → Read More: The Lives They Lived: Lisa Bonchek Adams

Health News Review Interview with Dr. Otis Brawley on Overdiagnosis

“Podcast: Pathologic profiling – Dr. Otis Brawley on cancer overdiagnosis” by Gary Schwitzer, Health News Review.

It its 5th in a series of podcasts on overdiagnosis, Health News Review publisher Gary Schwitzer speaks with chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, Dr. Otis Brawley.

The in-depth interview was a refreshing break from usual discussions . . . → Read More: Health News Review Interview with Dr. Otis Brawley on Overdiagnosis

This is why you shouldn’t believe that exciting new medical study

“This is why you shouldn’t believe that exciting new medical study,” by Julia Belluz, Vox.

In 2003, researchers writing in the American Journal of Medicine discovered something that should change how you think about medical news. They looked at 101 studies published in top scientific journals between 1979 and 1983 that claimed a new therapy . . . → Read More: This is why you shouldn’t believe that exciting new medical study

Strong report questions effectiveness of breast cancer screening — but needed a discussion of study limitations

“Strong report questions effectiveness of breast cancer screening — but needed a discussion of study limitations” by Health News Review.

Health News Review (HNR) evaluates health news using systematic criteria to assess the extent to which a news story uses adequately addresses evidence.

HNR argues that a growing body of evidence suggests that screening . . . → Read More: Strong report questions effectiveness of breast cancer screening — but needed a discussion of study limitations

Questions about Mayo Clinic deal with Minneapolis TV station

“Questions about Mayo Clinic deal with Minneapolis TV station,” by Trudy Lieberman, Health News Review.

Health News Review publishes a guest blog post by Trudy Lieberman, a veteran health care journalist who, for years, has tracked the cracks in the wall between health care news and health care advertising/sponsorship arrangements.

Back in 2007 writing for . . . → Read More: Questions about Mayo Clinic deal with Minneapolis TV station

Why did the mammography study get so much news, but the DCIS study didn’t?

“Why did last week’s mammography study get so much news, but the DCIS study didn’t?” by Gary Schwitzer, Health News Review.

Health News Review editor Gary Schwitzer argues that journalists were handed a wonderful opportunity to educate readers about one important part of the dilemma in breast cancer screening recommendations, but most of them blew . . . → Read More: Why did the mammography study get so much news, but the DCIS study didn’t?

The Fault In Our Stars: When Celebrity Health Advice Conflicts With Our Science

“The Fault In Our Stars: When Celebrity Health Advice Conflicts With Our Science,” by Dr. J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP, Dr Len’s Cancer Blog.

Dr. J. Leonard Lichtenfeld currently serves as Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the American Cancer Society. In a recent blog post, he wisely cautions against celebrity health advice. “People are entitled . . . → Read More: The Fault In Our Stars: When Celebrity Health Advice Conflicts With Our Science

When cancer is not cancer

“When cancer is not cancer.” By Peggy Orenstein, The California Sunday Magazine.

Peggy Orenstein (The New York Times bestselling author and contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine) writes a short, provocative profile of an influential cancer specialist in San Francisco who has proposed reclassifying nearly a third of breast cancer cases, and is . . . → Read More: When cancer is not cancer

When The TODAY Show Told This Metastatic Breast Cancer Warrior She Wasn’t Bald Enough

“When The TODAY Show Told This Metastatic Breast Cancer Warrior She Wasn’t Bald Enough.” By Jennifer Campisano, Women You Should Know.

How could the media continue to trivialize and “pink-ify” our disease, while pushing those of us who will die from it to the sidelines?

It started with an article about Joan Lunden, . . . → Read More: When The TODAY Show Told This Metastatic Breast Cancer Warrior She Wasn’t Bald Enough

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