Doing More for Patients Often Does No Good

“Doing More for Patients Often Does No Good,” Aaron E. Carroll, The New York Times.

Given the remarkable advances that have been made in the last 50 or so years in pharmaceuticals, medical devices and surgical procedures, it’s not a surprise that people want more, and more invasive, care than they have had in the . . . → Read More: Doing More for Patients Often Does No Good

Don’t Homogenize Health Care

“Don’t Homogenize Health Care,” Sandeep Jauhar The New York Times.

In American medicine today, “variation” has become a dirty word. Variation in the treatment of a medical condition is associated with wastefulness, lack of evidence and even capricious care. To minimize variation, insurers and medical specialty societies have banded together . . . → Read More: Don’t Homogenize Health Care

Dear patient: Your 5-minute appointment is awaiting you.

“Dear patient: Your 5-minute appointment is awaiting you.” By Susan Hecker, KevinMD Blog.

Dear patient: I am writing to inform you of some recent changes to my practice. These changes have been implemented to improve the quality of your care.

This satirical letter to a patient is a poignant illustration of some of a major . . . → Read More: Dear patient: Your 5-minute appointment is awaiting you.

Veterans Kick The Prescription Pill Habit Against Doctors' Orders

“Veterans Kick The Prescription Pill Habit, Against Doctors’ Orders.” By Quil Lawrence, NPR.

For many people with post-traumatic stress disorder, you’ve ever been, at the worst possible moment. “I always see his face,” says Will, who did tours in Iraq and Afghanistan with the Army. “And in my dreams it’s the same thing. … I . . . → Read More: Veterans Kick The Prescription Pill Habit Against Doctors’ Orders

Learning the difference between medicine and the medical industry

“Learning the difference between medicine and the medical industry.” By Nathaniel P. Morris, The Boston Globe.

Last month, I was standing in an intensive care unit, wearing my white coat and trying to look like I knew what I was doing. My third year of medical school had just begun. It was my first day . . . → Read More: Learning the difference between medicine and the medical industry

What the Reduction in Tonsillectomies Teaches Us About Medicine

“What the Reduction in Tonsillectomies Teaches Us About Medicine.” By Aaron Carroll, The New York Times.

When I was a child, one of my favorite books was “Curious George Goes to the Hospital.” It told the story of a little monkey who swallowed a puzzle piece, needed an operation to . . . → Read More: What the Reduction in Tonsillectomies Teaches Us About Medicine

Quality-Focused Care Misses The Mark

“‘Nothing Is Broken’: For An Injured Doctor, Quality-Focused Care Misses The Mark.’” By Charlotte Yeh, Health Affairs.

When a physician winds up in the emergency department, providers put quality metrics and testing before her actual needs.

It was just after 6 o’clock in the evening on Wednesday, December 7, 2011—Pearl Harbor Day—when I left my . . . → Read More: Quality-Focused Care Misses The Mark

Study: Costly Breast Cancer Treatment More Common At For-Profit Hospitals

“Study: Costly Breast Cancer Treatment More Common At For-Profit Hospitals.” By Roni Caryn Rabin, Kaiser Health News.

Research funded by the National Cancer Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation published in the May issue of the journal Surgery finds that “reimbursement is a significant driver of the adoption of new cancer therapies.” Dr. Cary . . . → Read More: Study: Costly Breast Cancer Treatment More Common At For-Profit Hospitals

The Lies That Doctors and Patients Tell

“The Lies That Doctors and Patients Tell, by Sandeep Jauhar, MD, The New York Times Well Blog.

The doctor-patient relationship is ideally an intimate partnership where information is exchanged openly and honestly. That is seldom the reality, however. Deception in the doctor-patient relationship is more common than we’d like to believe.

We don’t always reveal . . . → Read More: The Lies That Doctors and Patients Tell

We Are Giving Ourselves Cancer

“We Are Giving Ourselves Cancer.” By Rita Redberg and Rebecca Smith-Bindman, The New York Times.

DESPITE great strides in prevention and treatment, cancer rates remain stubbornly high and may soon surpass heart disease as the leading cause of death in the United States. Increasingly, we and many other experts believe that an . . . → Read More: We Are Giving Ourselves Cancer

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