Cancer All-Clear For Night Shift Work Based On Bad Science

By Rory O’Neill, Hazards Magazine editor

A recent Oxford University study concluding that night shift work should no longer be classified as a cause of breast cancer was based on ‘bad science’, top researchers warn.

The large scale ‘meta-analysis using data from 1.4 million women, published online on October 6th, 2016 in the Journal . . . → Read More: Cancer All-Clear For Night Work Based On Bad Science

Congress Shouldn’t Pass FDA Reform Bills Without Addressing Patient Safety and Drug Prices

“Congress Shouldn’t Pass FDA Reform Bills Without Addressing Patient Safety and Drug Prices,” Diana Zuckerman, The Health Care Blog.

A major proposed law that alters the way the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves drugs and medical devices has been wending its way through Congress since 2014. The Cures bill and Senate legislation seek . . . → Read More: Congress Shouldn’t Pass FDA Reform Bills Without Addressing Patient Safety and Drug Prices

Blaming the Southern Victim: A Case in Italy

Why is so much attention being drawn to lifestyle risks in places where the risk of developing cancer due to environmental factors has already been established?

Toxic refuse has been illegally disposed of for a long time (potentially since the late 1980s) in Campania, a territory in Italy known as Terra dei fuochi (‘Land of . . . → Read More: Blaming the Southern Victim: A Case in Italy

Panel Reasserts Mammogram Advice That Triggered Breast Cancer Debate

“Panel Reasserts Mammogram Advice That Triggered Breast Cancer Debate,” The New York Times, Jan. 11, 2016.

In 2009, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (an independent volunteer board of doctors and other experts appointed by the Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate screening tests, counseling, and medications . . . → Read More: Panel Reasserts Mammogram Advice That Triggered Breast Cancer Debate

How Should We Address Breast Cancer When Norms Continually Change?

Accompanying Photograph: Andy Katz/Demotix/Corbis

When faced with decisions about breast cancer treatment or screening, it can be hard to know what to think.

Gayle Sulik, The Guardian, Oct. 20, 2015

Three decades ago, researchers believed breast cancer was one disease, so it made sense to treat it that . . . → Read More: How Should We Address Breast Cancer When Norms Continually Change?

Why Doctors Are Rethinking Breast-Cancer Treatment

“Why Doctors Are Rethinking Breast-Cancer Treatment,” by Siobhan O’Connor, Time.

“What if I decide to just do nothing?”

It was kind of a taunt, Desiree Basila admits. Not the sort of thing that usually comes out of the mouth of a woman who’s just been diagnosed with breast cancer. For 20 minutes she’d been grilling . . . → Read More: Why Doctors Are Rethinking Breast-Cancer Treatment

Study Suggests Some Treatment For Early Breast Cancer Is Unnecessary

“Study Suggests Some Treatment For Early Breast Cancer Is Unnecessary,” by Rob Stein, NPR.

Nearly 70,000 women are diagnosed with DCIS each year. DCIS is an overgrowth of cells within the lining of the milk ducts. Such growths are not dangerous unless they break through and invade other breast tissue and ultimately spread to lymph . . . → Read More: Study Suggests Some Treatment For Early Breast Cancer Is Unnecessary

Early-stage breast cancer patients get too much testing: study

“Early-stage breast cancer patients get too much testing: study,” by Elizabeth Payne, Ottawa Citizen.

A study of 26,547 patients found that nearly 80 per cent of those with Stage 1 breast cancer and more than 90 per cent of those with Stage 2 had unnecessary tests, according to guidelines set out by Cancer Care Ontario, . . . → Read More: Early-stage breast cancer patients get too much testing: study

Study Suggests Dense Breast Tissue Isn’t Always a High Cancer Risk

“Study Suggests Dense Breast Tissue Isn’t Always a High Cancer Risk,” by Denise Grady, The New York Times.

Not only is breast density linked to an increased risk of cancer, it also makes cancer harder to detect because dense tissue can hide tumors from X-rays. But the new research indicates that not all women with . . . → Read More: Study Suggests Dense Breast Tissue Isn’t Always a High Cancer Risk

Tamoxifen for Prevention of Breast Cancer: Extended Long-Term Follow-Up of the IBIS-I Breast Cancer Prevention Trial

The longest randomized controlled trial to date on breast cancer chemoprevention with tamoxifen (a synthetic drug that blocks the effects of estrogen), IBIS-I, recently reported, after 16 years of follow-up, a 29 percent reduction in breast cancer (invasive and noninvasive types) for ‘high-risk’ women taking the drug for 5 years. The reduction in breast cancer . . . → Read More: Tamoxifen for Prevention of Breast Cancer: Extended Long-Term Follow-Up of the IBIS-I Breast Cancer Prevention Trial

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