The Dehumanizing Impact of Biomedical Surveillance

Writer Adam Bessie was diagnosed with a form of brain cancer six years ago. Since that time, he’s had at least 30 MRIs. In the six-week period it took him to complete his most recent writing project, he had radiation treatments and x-ray scans five days a week. That’s 30 more scans! It stands to . . . → Read More: The Dehumanizing Impact of Biomedical Surveillance

The Invisible Scars: Feminist Perspectives on Breast Cancer

Cicatrius (in)visibles (The Invisible Scars), a new book edited by Ana Porroche-Escudero, Gerard Coll-Planas, and Caterina Riba published in March (2016) by Capsa de Pandora.

The book, translated into in Catalan, demystifies the dominant discourses of pink ribbon culture, analyzes androcentric, political, and economic biases in breast cancer biomedicine, and explores embodied resistance . . . → Read More: The Invisible Scars: Feminist Perspectives on Breast Cancer

Beatriz Figueroa: Relinking cancer treatments, incapacity to work, the social security system, and patients economic rights

I met Beatriz Figueroa in cyberspace. We started having e-discussions after I learned about her provocative new awareness campaign, “Life is not the same after breast cancer.” She leads a national e-campaign calling for a law to protect the economic rights of cancer patients. I was humbled and inspired by her work because she pushes . . . → Read More: Beatriz Figueroa: Relinking cancer treatments, incapacity to work, the social security system, and patients economic rights,

Treat me like a statistic and save my life

Laurie Becklund: Treat me like a statistic and save my life (16:09)

Former writer for the L.A. Times Laurie Becklund, Senior Fellow, USC Annenberg, presents at Stanford Medicine X at Stanford University on Sunday, September 7, 2014. She died at age 66 from metastatic breast cancer (the spread of cancer to different parts of . . . → Read More: Treat me like a statistic and save my life

Tinged Pink: When The Cancer Narrative Can't Compass Your Loss

“Tinged Pink: When The Cancer Narrative Can’t Compass Your Loss.” By Erika Anderson, Gawker.

The American insistence on hope has become a burden. It’s the smile stamped on tragedy. Not only must you brace for the inevitable, but you must do so with glee. Consider the man who marathons even though he’s dying of brain . . . → Read More: Tinged Pink: When The Cancer Narrative Can’t Compass Your Loss

Living with stage 4

“Living with stage 4,” By Diane Mapes, Hutch News, Oct. 24, 2014.

In a culture focused on survivorship, those with metastatic breast cancer who will be in treatment for the rest of their lives can feel isolated and misunderstood.

An estimated 155,000-plus women (and men) in the U.S. currently live with “mets,” stage 4 . . . → Read More: Living with stage 4

True October

“True October,” By Jody Schoger. Women with Cancer.

The issue isn’t whether or not awareness helps but the kind of awareness we need to advocate for, the kind of awareness worth the time you have here on earth. Coping with October is about focus, not on noise or commercialization, but on the very real work . . . → Read More: True October

Avoiding the Breast Cancer ‘Warrior’ Trap

“Avoiding the Breast Cancer ‘Warrior’ Trap.” By Peter Bach, The Cut.

Doctor and widow Peter Bach takes aim at the spectacle surrounding Amy Robach’s public breast cancer story.

“A few months ago, I was at a lunchtime fund-raiser for Gilda’s Club, a support organization for those living with cancer, when I heard Good Morning America‘s . . . → Read More: Avoiding the Breast Cancer ‘Warrior’ Trap

When a patient chooses a different path

“When a patient chooses a different path.” By Lori Marx-Rubiner, Reimagine Magazine.

I wish my support group had been able to honor Betty’s choice to not seek treatment.

One day, about 15 minutes before a support group session I was facilitating was scheduled to begin, Betty arrived. She was new to our group, and she . . . → Read More: When a patient chooses a different path

Documenting the invisible scars of breast cancer treatment

Some breast cancer treatments leave visible scars. Others, though common and devastating, are rendered invisible both by the medical frameworks that fail to document them and the public discussions that drown them out with rhetoric. Two taboo topics in breast cancer? sexuality and side effects. An anthropologist in Spain breaks the silence.

Ana Porroche-Escudero published . . . → Read More: Documenting the invisible scars of breast cancer treatment

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