“Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

““Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks,” by Lisa Rosenbaum MD, New England Journal of Medicine.

“Misfearing,” the term Cass Sunstein uses to describe the human tendency to fear instinctively rather than factually, is not unique to women’s perceived health threats. Decades of research on risk perception have revealed the many factors . . . → Read More: “Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

Angelina Jolie and the One Percent

“Angelina Jolie and the One Percent” was originally published in Scientific American on May 20th, 2013.

After learning that she had inherited a mutation on one of the so-called breast cancer genes, actress Angelina Jolie decided to have a double mastectomy to reduce her risk of developing breast cancer. She also plans to have her . . . → Read More: Angelina Jolie and the One Percent

More on My Story and Why My Reconstruction is Not a “Sexy Boob Job”

“More on My Story, Why My Reconstruction is Not a “Sexy Boob Job.” By Peggy Orenstein, Peggy Orenstein Blog.

“I don’t think women who choose bilateral mastectomy are cowards. But I also don’t think they are heroes. Not even Angelina Jolie. Is she really braver than someone who opted for surveillance, or to have her . . . → Read More: Why My Reconstruction is Not a “Sexy Boob Job”

No Easy Choices on Reconstruction

“No Easy Choices on Reconstruction.” By Roni Caryn Rabin, The New York Times Well Blog.

Last week the actress Angelina Jolie announced in The New York Times that she had had a double mastectomy in February after testing positive for a genetic mutation that put her at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. She . . . → Read More: No Easy Choices on Reconstruction

Celebrity Breasts and Corporate Gene Patents

Actress Angelina Jolie leaves Lancaster House after attending the G8 Foreign Ministers’ conference on April 11, 2013 in London. (OLI SCARFF / GETTY IMAGES)

Angelina Jolie’s op-ed in The New York Times was big news yesterday. Jolie shared her family history of cancer, her own genetic mutation, and her choice to have prophylactic . . . → Read More: Celebrity Breasts and Corporate Gene Patents

The Choice

“The Choice.” By Mark E. Robson, MD, The Huffington Post.

I must confess that I am very conflicted about adding to the river of words that have been written about Angelina Jolie’s decision to undergo a risk-reducing (preventive) mastectomy. She made a difficult choice, and has discussed that choice with power and grace, in the . . . → Read More: The Choice

NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer

“NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer.” Press Release, National Cancer Institute

A protein associated with conditions of metabolic imbalance, such as diabetes and obesity, may play a role in the development of aggressive forms of breast cancer, according to new findings by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part . . . → Read More: NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer

Facing Cancer, a Stark Choice

“Facing Cancer, A Stark Choice.” By Tara Parker-Pope, The New York Times

In the 1970s, women’s health advocates were highly suspicious of mastectomies. They argued that surgeons — in those days, pretty much an all-male club — were far too quick to remove a breast after a diagnosis of cancer, with disfiguring results. But today, . . . → Read More: Facing Cancer, A Stark Choice

Breast cancer risk in relation to occupations

“Breast cancer risk in relation to occupations.” By J.T. Brophy and Colleagues, Environmental Health (PDF)

Endocrine disrupting chemicals and carcinogens, some of which may not yet have been classified as such, are present in many occupational environments and could increase breast cancer risk. Prior research has identified associations with breast cancer and work in agricultural . . . → Read More: Breast cancer risk in relation to occupations

Breast Cancer and the Environment

A 2011 report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach, examines the existing literature on breast cancer risk posed by various environmental factors, highlights actions that offer potential to reduce risk, and recommends key areas for future research. The report, sponsored by Susan G. Komen for the . . . → Read More: Breast Cancer and the Environment