Cancer Researchers Find “The Angelina Jolie Effect”

“Cancer Researchers Find “The Angelina Jolie Effect” By Kyle Hill, Nerdist.

When Angelina Jolie learned about her own genetic predisposition to breast cancer – and made her diagnosis and treatment very public – she unknowingly urged thousands of women to follow her lead. The announcement of her surgery was maybe more galvanizing than any recent . . . → Read More: Cancer Researchers Find “The Angelina Jolie Effect”

Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests

“Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests,” By Denise Grady and Andrew Pollack. The New York Times.

Within the next year, at least 100,000 people in the U.S. are expected to have genetic tests. Building on the success of using genetic tests to uncover inherited risks of breast, ovarian and colon . . . → Read More: Finding Risks, Not Answers, in Gene Tests

Cancer and the Secrets of Your Genes

“Cancer and the Secrets of Your Genes.” By Theodora Ross, The New York Times.

An oncologist looks at the evidence for genetic testing in certain circumstances. This takes the conversation a step further.

On Aug. 6, researchers announced in The New England Journal of Medicine that they . . . → Read More: Cancer and the Secrets of Your Genes

Why more women are choosing double mastectomies

“Why more women are choosing double mastectomies.” By Allison Gilbert, CNN.

The number of women with early stage breast cancer who went on to remove both breasts (even though only one breast had cancer) increased by more than 150% between 1998 and 2003, according to a study presented by Dr. Kelly Hunt at the annual . . . → Read More: Why more women are choosing double mastectomies

Patients, Patents, and Profits in a Genomic Age

When the Human Genome Project started in 1990 there were fewer than 100 genes associated with human diseases. The first genetic mutation (for Huntington’s disease) was identified in 1986, just a few years before the Project started. After more than a decade of technological innovation and about $3.8 billion, a team of scientists across more . . . → Read More: Patients, Patents, and Profits in a Genomic Age