Patients, Patents, and Profits in a Genomic Age

When the Human Genome Project started in 1990 there were fewer than 100 genes associated with human diseases. The first genetic mutation (for Huntington’s disease) was identified in 1986, just a few years before the Project started. After more than a decade of technological innovation and about $3.8 billion, a team of scientists across more . . . → Read More: Patients, Patents, and Profits in a Genomic Age

Human Gene Patentability Case Heads To Supreme Court

“Human Gene Patentability Case Heads To Supreme Court.” By Sharon Begley, Reuters (via Huffington Post).

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted patents on at least 4,000 human genes to companies, universities and others that have discovered and decoded them. Patents now cover some 40 percent of the human genome, according to a scientific . . . → Read More: Human Gene Patentability Case Heads To Supreme Court

Can We Patent Life?

“Can We Patent Life?” By Michael Specter, The New Yorker.

On April 12, 1955, Jonas Salk, who had recently invented the polio vaccine, appeared on the television news show “See It Now” to discuss its impact on American society. Before the vaccine became available, dread of polio was almost as widespread as the disease itself. . . . → Read More: Can We Patent Life?