“Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

““Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks,” by Lisa Rosenbaum MD, New England Journal of Medicine.

“Misfearing,” the term Cass Sunstein uses to describe the human tendency to fear instinctively rather than factually, is not unique to women’s perceived health threats. Decades of research on risk perception have revealed the many factors . . . → Read More: “Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

“In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent” By Mary Elizabeth Williams, Los Angeles Times.

It’s been three years since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force launched the mammography wars with its recommendation that most women get fewer of the breast cancer screening exams — one every other year between the ages . . . → Read More: In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

Study: Advanced Cancer Patients Mistakenly Believe Chemotherapy is Curative

“Advanced Patients Mistakenly Believe Chemo is Curative.” By Lindsey Heather, Oncology Times

The majority of patients with advanced lung or advanced colorectal cancer—69 and 81 percent, respectively—mistakenly believe that chemotherapy can cure their disease, according to a new study by the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium (CanCORS), published in the New England Journal . . . → Read More: Advanced Patients Mistakenly Believe Chemo is Curative

Ignoring the Science on Mammograms

“Ignoring the Science on Mammograms. By David H. Newman MD, The New York Times Well Blog

Last week The New England Journal of Medicine published a study with the potential to change both medical practice and public consciousness about mammograms. Published on Thanksgiving Day, the research examined more than 30 years of United States health . . . → Read More: Ignoring the Science on Mammograms

Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?

“Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?” By H. Gilbert Welch, The New York Times

For decades women have been told that one of the most important things they can do to protect their health is to have regular mammograms. But over the past few years, it’s become increasingly clear that these screenings are not all . . . → Read More: Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?

Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence

“Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence.” By A. Bleyer and H.G. Welch, New England Journal of Medicine

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine concludes that one-third of all newly diagnosed breast cancers are the result of overdiagnosis, and screening is having a marginal effect on the breast . . . → Read More: Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence

Cancer Screening Campaigns — Getting Past Uninformative Persuasion

“Cancer Screening Campaigns — Getting Past Uninformative Persuasion.” By Steven Woloshin, M.D., Lisa M. Schwartz, M.D., William C. Black, M.D., and Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., M.P.H., New England Journal of Medicine

For nearly a century, public health organizations, professional associations, patient advocacy groups, academics, and clinicians largely viewed cancer screening as a simple, safe way . . . → Read More: Cancer Screening Campaigns — Getting Past Uninformative Persuasion