Should We Rename DCIS?

Ductal carcinoma in situ was all over the news this week, after the Journal of the American Medical Association published “Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment in Cancer, An Opportunity for Improvement.” This is a good, and necessary, conversation. DCIS was front and center as one of the prime candidates for overtreatment, and the panel proposed renaming it . . . → Read More: Should We Rename DCIS?

What’s In A Name? Cancer – or Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin

“What’s In A Name? Cancer – or Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin.” By Jody Schoger, Michael S. Cowher, M.D., and Deanna J. Attai, M.D., F.A.C.S., BCSMCommunity.org.

What’s in a name? In the case of cancer, there are myths, fears and misinformation – more than perhaps any other illness. Cancer encompasses hundreds of different diseases and . . . → Read More: What’s In A Name? Cancer – or Indolent Lesions of Epithelial Origin

“Carcinoma”: What’s in a name?

As part of a National Cancer Institute working group, Dr. Laura J. Esserman MD, MBA of Mt Zion Carol Franc Buck Breast Cancer Center along with colleagues Ian Thompson MD of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and Brian Reid MD, PhD of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, . . . → Read More: “Carcinoma”: What’s in a name?

The $2.7 Trillion Medical Bill

“The $2.7 Trillion Medical Bill.” By Elisabeth Rosenthal, The New York Times.

Deirdre Yapalater’s recent colonoscopy at a surgical center near her home here on Long Island went smoothly: she was whisked from pre-op to an operating room where a gastroenterologist, assisted by an anesthesiologist and a nurse, performed the routine cancer screening procedure in . . . → Read More: The $2.7 Trillion Medical Bill

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

“Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer.” By Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times Magazine.

I used to believe that a mammogram saved my life. I even wrote that in the pages of this magazine. It was 1996, and I had just turned 35 when my doctor sent me for an initial screening — a . . . → Read More: Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?

“Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?” By Christine Norton and Karen Sepucha, Health News Review).

Health News Review evaluates health reporting on medical interventions from the top ten circulating newspapers in the United States. The evaluation is based on established criteria related to costs of the intervention, quantification of benefits and harms, critical evaluation of . . . → Read More: Are Pricey Computer-Aided Mammograms Worth It?

In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

“In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent” By Mary Elizabeth Williams, Los Angeles Times.

It’s been three years since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force launched the mammography wars with its recommendation that most women get fewer of the breast cancer screening exams — one every other year between the ages . . . → Read More: In poll, 61% of doctors say mammograms should be less frequent

The Risk-Benefit Calculation of Mammograms

“The Risk-Benefit Calculation of Mammograms.” By Christie Aschwanden, Slate

Last week on Slate, physician Meri Kolbrener lamented that she didn’t have a good way to explain the latest evidence on mammography to her patients. When patients ask her if they should get a mammogram, Kolbrener’s answer is, “I don’t know.” Kolbrener is correct that the . . . → Read More: The Risk-Benefit Calculation of Mammograms

Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?

“Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?” By H. Gilbert Welch, The New York Times

For decades women have been told that one of the most important things they can do to protect their health is to have regular mammograms. But over the past few years, it’s become increasingly clear that these screenings are not all . . . → Read More: Cancer Survivor or Victim of Diagnosis?