Susan Komen CEO's salary draws fire as donations drop, races are canceled

“Susan Komen CEO’s salary draws fire as donations drop, races are canceled” By Lisa Myers and Talesha Reynolds, NBC News.

When the Susan G. Komen Foundation announced last week that it was canceling half of its 3-Day races next year, the charity blamed the economy. But it also acknowledged that its decision to stop providing . . . → Read More: Susan Komen CEO’s salary draws fire as donations drop, races are canceled

Did Backlash Prompt Komen’s Cancellations?

“Did Backlash Prompt Komen’s Cancellations?” By Winston Ross, The Daily Beast.

Lisa Bonchek Adams hopped off the Komen “bandwagon” years ago, long before the charity that puts on “Race For The Cure” events all over the world threatened to yank its funding for Planned Parenthood. Adams was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006, and in . . . → Read More: Did Backlash Prompt Komen’s Cancellations?

The sad decline of Komen for the Cure

“The sad decline of Komen for the Cure.” By Mary Elizabeth Williams, Salon.

The streets will be a little less pink next year. One of the world’s most prominent breast cancer organizations, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, announced this week it’s canceling its annual “3-Day” fundraising event — a “60-mile walk for women and . . . → Read More: The sad decline of Komen for the Cure

Why is Nancy Brinker still CEO of the Susan G. Komen foundation?

“Why is Nancy Brinker still CEO of the Susan G. Komen foundation?” By Jena McGregor, The Washington Post.

The Susan G. Komen foundation announced Monday that in 2014 the breast cancer charity would be cancelling seven of its three-day walks, or half of its annual multi-day events. The organization said the cancellations were a result . . . → Read More: Why is Nancy Brinker still CEO of the Susan G. Komen foundation?

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

“Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer.” By Peggy Orenstein, The New York Times Magazine.

I used to believe that a mammogram saved my life. I even wrote that in the pages of this magazine. It was 1996, and I had just turned 35 when my doctor sent me for an initial screening — a . . . → Read More: Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer

Research Brief --

Professors Lori Baralt of California State University, Long Beach and Tracy A. Weitz of University of California, San Francisco published a commentary in Women’s Health Issues (PDF) [2012; 22-6:e509-e512] about the Komen-Planned Parenthood Controversy and the long history of politicization that preceded the incident. They argue that the scandal was largely presented in mass media . . . → Read More: Research Brief — “The Komen–Planned Parenthood Controversy: Bringing the Politics of Breast Cancer Advocacy to the Forefront”

Bringing on the pink

Published in the Philadelphia Inquirer

Komen Race for the Cure participants pitched pink tents and wacky signs in the Pennsylvania Convention Center this month. APRIL SAUL / Staff Photographer

Every October, as surely as the leaves turn, Susan G. Komen for the Cure’s pink-ribbon celebration marks Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But when a . . . → Read More: Bringing on the pink

A teaching moment about politics and Komen

“A teaching moment about politics and Komen.” By Samantha King, CNN

When the Komen foundation bowed to pressure from anti-abortion activists to stop most of its funding of Planned Parenthood, the furor was swift and forceful. Komen’s decision was frequently described in the media and in the online outcry as a “betrayal” — of its . . . → Read More: A teaching moment about politics and Komen

Why the Komen/Planned Parenthood Breakup—While It Lasted—Was Good for Feminism

“Why the Komen/Planned Parenthood Breakup—While It Lasted—Was Good for Feminism.” By Amy Schiller, The Nation

It might not look like it at first, but Komen’s actions and the ensuing backlash are a huge boon for the feminist movement. The past decades have seen the rise of a nominally apolitical marketing campaign masquerading as feminism, . . . → Read More: Why the Komen/Planned Parenthood Breakup—While It Lasted—Was Good for Feminism