Breast cancer charities: Where to give — and where to avoid

“Breast cancer charities: Where to give — and where to avoid,” USA Today.

The first thing you should do when considering donating is to check with charity watchdog groups that evaluate how well each organization spends the money it receives from contributors.

Two of the biggest charity watchdogs are Charity Watch and Charity Navigator. . . . → Read More: Breast cancer charities: Where to give — and where to avoid

Right to Try laws allow Big Pharma to exploit patients' hope

“Right to Try laws allow Big Pharma to exploit patients’ hope,” Diana Zuckerman, Chicago Tribune.

If you were dying of a terminal illness and your doctor said there were no proven treatments, would you take the risk of trying an experimental, unproven drug? Many patients would say yes. But as with most medical decisions, the . . . → Read More: Right to Try laws allow Big Pharma to exploit patients’ hope

Cancer Cells Spread Way Earlier Than Thought

“Cancer Cells Spread Way Earlier Than Thought,” Sharon Begley, STAT.

A highly readable article by journalist Sharon Begley in STAT discusses new research demonstrating that cancer cells are able to spread from a tumor much earlier than once believed. What’s more, these cells are more adept at forming potentially lethal metastases at distant sites (such . . . → Read More: Cancer Cells Spread Way Earlier Than Thought

Congress Shouldn’t Pass FDA Reform Bills Without Addressing Patient Safety and Drug Prices

“Congress Shouldn’t Pass FDA Reform Bills Without Addressing Patient Safety and Drug Prices,” Diana Zuckerman, The Health Care Blog.

A major proposed law that alters the way the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves drugs and medical devices has been wending its way through Congress since 2014. The Cures bill and Senate legislation seek . . . → Read More: Congress Shouldn’t Pass FDA Reform Bills Without Addressing Patient Safety and Drug Prices

Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancer

“Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancer,” Mary Chris Jaklevic, Health News Review.

Genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk is cheaper and easier than ever. But just because a test is available doesn’t mean everyone should get it. That message didn’t come through in a recent series of . . . → Read More: Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancer

A banner week for CDA (Celebrity Disease Awareness)

“A banner week for CDA (Celebrity Disease Awareness),” Alan Cassels, Health News Review.

Celebrity disease awareness (or pushing of disease-mongered conditions) is not going away soon. But maybe it could be tied to the goal of informing consumers instead of misleading them or promoting personal financial incentives. Here are a few celebs, for better or . . . → Read More: A banner week for CDA (Celebrity Disease Awareness)

Sheryl Crow hawks 3D mammograms with fear and false hope

“Sheryl Crow hawks 3D mammograms with fear and false hope”, Health News Review.

It may not be her favorite mistake, but it was a mistake nonetheless for the singer and breast cancer survivor Sheryl Crow to advocate in an aggressive, unbalanced way on behalf of a 3D mammography device.

That’s the takeaway of a number . . . → Read More: Sheryl Crow Hawks 3D Mammograms with Fear and False Hope

Powerful advocate for breast cancer survivors dies

“Powerful advocate for breast cancer survivors dies” by Liz Szabo, USA Today.

Jody Schoger understood what it meant to be isolated. She once described how she “curled up like a turtle” in her hospital bed while fighting the life-threatening infection that followed surgery for breast cancer in 1998.

“I remember never even opening the blinds, . . . → Read More: Powerful advocate for breast cancer survivors dies

Panel Reasserts Mammogram Advice That Triggered Breast Cancer Debate

“Panel Reasserts Mammogram Advice That Triggered Breast Cancer Debate,” The New York Times, Jan. 11, 2016.

In 2009, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (an independent volunteer board of doctors and other experts appointed by the Department of Health and Human Services to evaluate screening tests, counseling, and medications . . . → Read More: Panel Reasserts Mammogram Advice That Triggered Breast Cancer Debate

Why cancer screening has never been shown to “save lives”—and what we can do about it

The claim that cancer screening saves lives is based on fewer deaths due to the target cancer. In an article published in the bmj, Vinay Prasad, Jeanne Lenzer and David H Newman argue that reductions in overall mortality, not disease specific mortality, should be the benchmark. The authors call for higher standards of . . . → Read More: Why cancer screening has never been shown to “save lives”—and what we can do about it

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