U.S. Cancer Care Facing Crisis, Notes New IOM Report: Key to Improvement-Renewed Focus on Patient-Centered Care

“U.S. Cancer Care Facing Crisis, Notes New IOM Report: Key to Improvement-Renewed Focus on Patient-Centered Care.” Oncology Times.

An aging population and rising cancer incidence, along with increasing scientific complexity and rapidly escalating costs of care, are placing the U.S. cancer care system in crisis mode, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The comprehensive document, “Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis,” released here during a public webinar, describes a care system that is fragmented, delivers care that often does not meet patient preferences, and underuses palliative care and hospice services.

The number of older Americans—those most likely to develop cancer—is expected to double between 2010 and 2030, contributing to an expected 30 percent increase in the number of cancer survivors from 2012 to 2022 and a 45 percent rise in cancer incidence by 2030. The cost of cancer care, which is escalating much faster than that of other sectors of medicine, is expected to rise from $125 billion in 2010 to $173 billion by 2020, a 39 percent increase. In 2004 that cost was $72 billion.

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