Book Review: Waiting for Cancer to Come

Waiting for Cancer to Come weaves together women’s beliefs and experiences of genetic testing and its impact on their lives, families, and futures. Their detailed accounts of how they prepared for testing, made sense of the results, and made decisions about what to do with the information and cope with the aftermath are a window . . . → Read More: Book Review: Waiting for Cancer to Come

Book Review: Cultural Encyclopedia of the Breast

The first of its kind, a timely and much needed contribution to studies of this renowned body part and its cultural significance. . . .the Cultural Encyclopedia of the Breast is an essential, empowering resource for anyone interested in understanding the historical magnitude and cultural importance of the breast.

. . . → Read More: Book Review: Cultural Encyclopedia of the Breast

The Fault in Our Stars: Fictionalizing the Realities of Childhood Cancer

“The Fault in Our Stars: Fictionalizing the Realities of Childhood Cancer” By Tricia Paul, Investigating Illness Narratives.

“This is not so much an author’s note as an author’s reminder of what was printed in small type a few pages ago: This book is a work of fiction. I made it up.”

. . . → Read More: The Fault in Our Stars: Fictionalizing the Realities of Childhood Cancer

Book Review: My Soul Is Among Lions

Ellen Leopold’s unique collection of essays over a 20-year period (many of them written before there was an audience ready to receive them) illustrates important shifts in the medical and social history of breast cancer. She skillfully threads her way through the writings of impactful women and the contexts in which they lived, chronicling the . . . → Read More: Book Review: My Soul Is Among Lions by Ellen Leopold

Book Review: Mortality by Christopher Hitchens

Christopher Hitchens, a profound thinker and prolific author, writes his final book, Mortality (2012), about his life-ending illness. In describing the intimate experience of “livingly dying” with metastatic, esophageal cancer, Hitchens offers a highly personal narrative, sometimes poetic, and somewhat ironically, filled with humor. His fun and graceful use of language gives readers permission to . . . → Read More: Book Review: Mortality by Christopher Hitchens

Book Review: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Hazel Grace Lancaster, sixteen, has thyroid cancer. The drug Phalanxifor is “miraculously” holding back the tumors that spread to her lungs, and the cylindrical green oxygen tank she hauls behind her is helping to keep her lungs operational. But Hazel’s life has narrowed. She’s been out of school for three years. Convinced that her daughter . . . → Read More: Book Review: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Book Review: A Breast Cancer Alphabet by Madhulika Sikka

A Breast Cancer Alphabet is approachable, even light. But it’s not fluffy. Each letter invites readers to think about the power and the limits of language, to start a new conversation about one of the most talked about, venerated, and commercialized diseases in American culture.

— Gayle Sulik, Breast Cancer Consortium

A Breast . . . → Read More: Book Review: “A Breast Cancer Alphabet” by Madhulika Sikka

Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us

“Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us.” Nature, vol. 502, p. 167.

“Patients with cancer generate so much revenue for the US health care industry that a cure would be an economic risk. thus argues anthropologist S. Lochlann Jain, who deems cancer “a constitutive aspect of American social life, economics, and science” — so bizarrely entwined that . . . → Read More: Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us

Lives of the Cells: George Johnson’s ‘Cancer Chronicles’

“George Johnson’s ‘Cancer Chronicles.’” By David Quammen, The New York Times.

Cancer would seem a dreary, frightful topic if it weren’t also such a universal one. In this era of longer human life spans, it’s almost as inevitable as death and ­taxes. Most of us will experience some form of cancer — if not in . . . → Read More: Lives of the Cells: George Johnson’s ‘Cancer Chronicles’

Book Review and Analysis -- From Zero to Mastectomy: What I Learned and You Need to Know About Stage 0 Breast Cancer

At age 52, Jackie Fox was diagnosed with DCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ, a form of breast cancer labeled stage zero, compared to stages 1 to 4. This slim book is an up-close and personal story of Fox’s roller coaster journey — from the moment her doctor gave her the diagnosis, telling her it was . . . → Read More: Book Review and Analysis — From Zero to Mastectomy: What I Learned and You Need to Know About Stage 0 Breast Cancer

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