Book Review and Analysis -- From Zero to Mastectomy: What I Learned and You Need to Know About Stage 0 Breast Cancer

At age 52, Jackie Fox was diagnosed with DCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ, a form of breast cancer labeled stage zero, compared to stages 1 to 4. This slim book is an up-close and personal story of Fox’s roller coaster journey — from the moment her doctor gave her the diagnosis, telling her it was . . . → Read More: Book Review and Analysis — From Zero to Mastectomy: What I Learned and You Need to Know About Stage 0 Breast Cancer

Book Review: Am I My Genes? Confronting Fate and Family Secrets in the Age of Genetic Testing

Robert Klitzman’s “Am I My Genes?” explores a key question facing individuals in a genetic age: How does my genetic profile shape who I am and, in turn, what I believe? In-depth interviews with 64 people who have, or are at risk for, three diseases with identified genetic components (i.e., Huntington’s disease, breast and . . . → Read More: Book Review: Am I My Genes? Confronting Fate and Family Secrets in the Age of Genetic Testing

Why We're Losing the War on Cancer-and How to Win It

“Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer-and How to Win It.” The Leonard Lopate Show, WNYC.

Journalist and cancer survivor Clifton Leaf looks at why we have made such limited progress fighting the disease. In The Truth in Small Doses: Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer-and How to Win It describes why the public’s . . . → Read More: Why We’re Losing the War on Cancer-and How to Win It

Book Review -- From Pink to Green: Disease Prevention and the Environmental Breast Cancer Movement

From Pink to Green by Barbara Ley explores breast cancer within the larger context of women’s health at the nexus of environmental and health social movements in the United States.

Chronicling the environmental breast cancer movement from its beginnings, Ley explains how different advocacy organizations (from Breast Cancer Action and the Breast Cancer Fund . . . → Read More: Book Review — From Pink to Green: Disease Prevention and the Environmental Breast Cancer Movement

Book Review -- The Paradox of Hope: Journeys through a Clinical Borderland

This book is not about breast cancer. But it may be of interest to those who are exploring the discourse of hope that dominates biomedicine and the broader cultural landscape oriented to survivorship.

The Paradox of Hope by Cheryl Mattingly intimately explores the experiences of African American families who are caring for children with a . . . → Read More: Book Review — The Paradox of Hope

Book Review – “The Cancer Culture Chronicles”

I met Rachel Cheetham Moro through her writing. I found her blog, The Cancer Culture Chronicles, sometime during my own treatment for breast cancer. I became an avid reader of her insightful and often hilarious prose. Recently, Rachel’s writing has been published in book form, compiled and edited by her mother Mandy Cheetham and her . . . → Read More: Book Review – “The Cancer Culture Chronicles”

Book Review — “After the Cure: The Untold Stories of Breast Cancer Survivors”

“After the Cure” by medical historian Emily Abel and medical sociologist Saskia Subramanian is an important contribution to the understanding of survivorship, not as an identity so much but as a lived experience. it is about life after cancer treatment ends (if it ends) and the lingering or latent side effects. While some cancer . . . → Read More: Book Review — “After the Cure: The Untold Stories of Breast Cancer Survivors”

Book Review — “Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History”

Exhaustively researched and highly readable, science journalist Florence Williams’ latest book describes the remarkable and largely uncharted ecology of women’s breasts. Yes, ecology. It turns out that human breasts are in fact a complex and adaptable ecosystem, with a unique ability to tune in and respond to the world around them. Research has only . . . → Read More: Book Review — “Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History”

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